10-Q
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, DC 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

(Mark One)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2019

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number: 001-36370

 

 

 

LOGO

APPLIED GENETIC TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   59-3553710

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

14193 NW 119th Terrace, Suite 10, Alachua, Florida 32615

(Address of Principal Executive Offices, Including Zip Code)

(386) 462-2204

(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer      Accelerated filer  
Non-accelerated filer      Smaller reporting company  
     Emerging growth company  

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act  ☒

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ☐    No  ☒

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

  

Trading Symbol(s)

  

Name of each exchange

on which registered

Common Stock, $0.001 par value    AGTC    Nasdaq Global Market

The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding as of April 30, 2019 was 18,171,310

 

 

 


Table of Contents

APPLIED GENETIC TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

FORM 10-Q

FOR THE QUARTER ENDED MARCH 31, 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

         Pages  
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1.

  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Unaudited)      3  
  Condensed Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018      3  
  Condensed Statements of Operations for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018      4  
  Condensed Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018      5  
  Condensed Statements of Cash Flows for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018      6  
  Notes to Condensed Financial Statements      7  

ITEM 2.

  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS      20  

ITEM 3.

  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK      28  

ITEM 4.

  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES      28  
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1.

  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS      29  

ITEM 1A.

  RISK FACTORS      29  

ITEM 2.

  UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS      30  

ITEM 6.

  EXHIBITS      30  
SIGNATURES

 

 

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Table of Contents

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

APPLIED GENETIC TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

CONDENSED BALANCE SHEETS

(Unaudited)

 

In thousands, except per share data

   March 31,
2019
    June 30,
2018
 

ASSETS

    

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 21,570     $ 31,065  

Investments

     67,665       73,840  

Grants receivable

     26       210  

Prepaid and other current assets

     2,948       4,009  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     92,209       109,124  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

     4,500       5,254  

Intangible assets, net

     994       968  

Investment in Bionic Sight

     1,952       1,980  

Other assets

     1,260       1,206  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 100,915     $ 118,532  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

    

Current liabilities:

    

Accounts payable

   $ 1,450     $ 945  

Accrued and other liabilities

     7,024       7,155  

Deferred revenue

     —         6,295  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     8,474       14,395  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Deferred revenue, net of current portion

     —         610  

Other liabilities

     4,139       4,345  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     12,613       19,350  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock, par value $.001 per share, 5,000 shares authorized, no shares issued and outstanding

     —         —    

Common stock—par value $.001 per share; 150,000 shares authorized; 18,185 and 18,137 shares issued; 18,168 and 18,126 shares outstanding at March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018, respectively

     18       18  

Additional paid-in capital

     213,395       210,139  

Shares held in treasury of 17 and 11 at March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018, respectively

     (77     (49

Accumulated deficit

     (125,034     (110,926
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     88,302       99,182  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 100,915     $ 118,532  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements.

 

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APPLIED GENETIC TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

     Three Months
Ended March 31,
    Nine Months
Ended March 31,
 

In thousands, except per share amounts

   2019     2018     2019     2018  

Revenue:

        

Collaboration revenue

   $ 21,207     $ 3,588     $ 41,128     $ 18,727  

Grant and other revenue

     111       15       158       43  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

     21,318       3,603       41,286       18,770  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

        

Research and development

     7,203       7,353       24,851       23,355  

General and administrative and other

     3,110       3,946       9,345       11,020  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     10,313       11,299       34,196       34,375  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income/(loss) from operations

     11,005       (7,696     7,090       (15,605

Other income:

        

Investment income, net

     512       325       1,504       866  

Other expense

     —         —         —         (10
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other income, net

     512       325       1,504       856  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income/(loss) before provision for income taxes

     11,517       (7,371     8,594       (14,749

Provision/(benefit) for income taxes

     19       725       57       (66
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income/(loss) before equity in net losses of affiliate

     11,498       (8,096     8,537       (14,683

Total other loss, net

     (9     (5     (29     (5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income/(loss)

   $ 11,489     $ (8,101   $ 8,508     $ (14,688
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted Average Shares Outstanding

        

Weighted average shares outstanding—basic

     18,166       18,112       18,149       18,098  

Weighted average shares outstanding—diluted

     18,324       18,112       18,322       18,098  

Net earnings/(loss) per common share

        

Net earnings/(loss) per share, basic

   $ 0.63     $ (0.45   $ 0.47     $ (0.81

Net earnings/(loss) per share, diluted

   $ 0.63     $ (0.45   $ 0.46     $ (0.81

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements.

 

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APPLIED GENETIC TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(Unaudited)

 

     Common Stock      Treasury Stock     Additional
Paid-in
Capital
     Accumulated
Deficit
    Total  

In thousands

   Outstanding
Shares
     Amount      Outstanding
Shares
     Amount  

Balance, June 30, 2018

     18,126      $ 18        11      $ (49   $ 210,139      $ (110,926   $ 99,182  

Cumulative impact of adopting Topic 606

     —          —          —          —         —          (22,616     (22,616

Share based compensation expense

     —          —          —          —         1,181        —         1,181  

Shares issued under employee plans

     4        —          2        (8     —          —         (8

Net income

     —          —          —          —         —          1,200       1,200  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, September 30, 2018

     18,130        18        13        (57     211,320        (132,342     78,939  

Share based compensation expense

     —          —          —          —         1,094        —         1,094  

Shares issued under employee plans

     34        —          2        (13     136        —         123  

Net loss

     —          —          —          —         —          (4,181     (4,181
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, December 31, 2018

     18,164        18        15        (70     212,550        (136,523     75,975  

Share based compensation expense

     —          —          —          —         845        —         845  

Shares issued under employee plans

     4        —          2        (7     —          —         (7

Net income

     —          —          —          —         —          11,489       11,489  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, March 31, 2019

     18,168      $ 18        17      $ (77   $ 213,395      $ (125,034   $ 88,302  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
     Common Stock      Treasury Stock     Additional
Paid-in
Capital
     Accumulated
Deficit
    Total  

In thousands

   Outstanding
Shares
     Amount      Outstanding
Shares
     Amount  

Balance, June 30, 2017

     18,088      $ 18        —        $ —       $ 204,937      $ (89,626   $ 115,329  

Share based compensation expense

     —          —          —          —         1,469        —         1,469  

Shares issued under employee plans

     5        —          —          —         2        —         2  

Net loss

     —          —          —          —         —          (1,397     (1,397
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, September 30, 2017

     18,093        18        —          —         206,408        (91,023     115,403  

Share based compensation expense

     —          —          —          —         1,331        —         1,331  

Shares issued under employee plans

     12        —          —          —         39        —         39  

Net loss

     —          —          —          —         —          (5,190     (5,190
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, December 31, 2017

     18,105        18        —          —         207,778        (96,213     111,583  

Share based compensation expense

     —          —          —          —         1,237        —         1,237  

Shares issued under employee plans

     16        —          6        (23     —          —         (23

Net loss

     —          —          —          —         —          (8,101     (8,101
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, March 31, 2018

     18,121      $ 18        6      $ (23   $ 209,015      $ (104,314   $ 104,696  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements.

 

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APPLIED GENETIC TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

     Nine Months
Ended March 31,
 

In thousands

   2019     2018  

Cash flows from operating activities

    

Net income/(loss)

   $ 8,508     $ (14,688

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash (used in) operating activities:

    

Share-based compensation expense

     3,120       4,072  

Depreciation and amortization

     957       821  

Provision/(recovery) for uncollectible accounts, net

     (258     369  

Investment (discount accretion)/premium amortization, net

     (578     174  

Loss on disposal of property and equipment

     —         20  

Equity in net losses of affiliate

     29       5  

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

    

Grants receivable

     73       41  

Prepaid and other assets

     302       (1,946

Deferred revenues

     (28,393     (16,334

Accounts payable

     505       324  

Accrued and other liabilities

     (185     1,365  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash (used in) operating activities

     (15,920     (25,777
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

    

Purchase of property and equipment

     (81     (654

Purchase of and capitalized costs related to intangible assets

     (148     —    

Maturity of investments

     71,619       88,183  

Purchase of investments

     (64,866     (44,779
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by investing activities

     6,524       42,750  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

    

Proceeds from exercise of common stock options

     136       —    

Deferred offering costs

     (168     —    

Purchase of treasury stock

     (28     (17

Payments made toward capital lease obligations

     (39     (29
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash (used in) financing activities

     (99     (46
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net change in cash and cash equivalents

     (9,495     16,927  

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

     31,065       30,706  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

   $ 21,570     $ 47,633  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow

    

Cash paid during the period for income taxes

   $ —       $ 670  

Non-cash flow information

    

Capital lease obligation related to the purchase of equipment

   $ —       $ 240  

Lease incentive obligation related to the purchase of leasehold improvements

   $ —       $ 2,588  

Issuance of restricted stock for no consideration

   $ 28   $ 25  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements.

 

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APPLIED GENETIC TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

NOTES TO CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

 

1.

Organization and Operations:

Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (the “Company” or “AGTC”) was incorporated as a Florida corporation on January 19, 1999 and reincorporated as a Delaware corporation on October 24, 2003. The Company is a clinical-stage biotechnology company that uses a proprietary gene therapy platform to develop transformational genetic therapies for patients suffering from rare and debilitating diseases.

In July 2015, the Company entered into a collaboration agreement (the “Collaboration Agreement”) with Biogen MA, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Biogen Inc. (“Biogen”), pursuant to which the Company and Biogen will collaborate to develop, seek regulatory approval for and commercialize gene therapy products to treat X-linked retinoschisis (“XLRS”), X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (“XLRP”), and discovery programs targeting three indications based on the Company’s adeno-associated virus vector technologies. The Collaboration Agreement became effective in August 2015. On December 7, 2018, the Company received notice from Biogen that it had elected to terminate the Collaboration Agreement, which became effective as of March 8, 2019. The Collaboration Agreement and other transactions with Biogen are discussed further in Note 6 to these Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements.

The Company has devoted substantially all of its efforts to research and development, including clinical trials. The Company has not completed the development of any products. The Company has generated revenue from collaboration agreements, sponsored research payments and grants, but has not generated product revenue to date and is subject to a number of risks similar to those of other early stage companies in the biotechnology industry, including dependence on key individuals, the difficulties inherent in the development of commercially viable products, the need to obtain additional capital necessary to fund the development of its products, development by the Company or its competitors of technological innovations, risks of failure of clinical studies, protection of proprietary technology, compliance with government regulations and ability to transition to large-scale production of products. As of March 31, 2019, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $125.0 million. While the Company expects to continue to generate some revenue from partnering, the Company expects to incur losses for the foreseeable future. The Company has funded its operations to date primarily through public offerings of its common stock, private placements of its preferred stock, and collaborations. As of March 31, 2019, the Company had cash and cash equivalents and liquid investments of $89.2 million.

 

2.

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies:

Basis of presentation

The accompanying Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) and, in the opinion of management, include all adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of the Company’s financial position, results of operations, stockholders’ equity and cash flows for the periods presented.

The adjustments referred to above are of a normal and recurring nature. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP have been condensed or omitted pursuant to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) rules and regulations for interim reporting.

The Condensed Balance Sheet as of June 30, 2018 was derived from audited financial statements but does not include all disclosures required by U.S. GAAP. These Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements included in the Company’s 2018 Annual Report on Form 10-K (“June 30, 2018 Form 10-K”). Results of operations for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year or any other interim period.

Segment reporting

Operating segments are identified as components of an enterprise about which separate discrete financial information is available for evaluation by the chief operating decision-maker in making decisions regarding resource allocation and assessing performance. To date, we have viewed our operations and managed our business as one segment.

 

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Use of estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP and SEC regulations, requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amount of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash consists of funds held in bank accounts. Cash equivalents consist of short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of 90 days or less at the time of purchase and generally include money market accounts.

Investments

The Company’s investments consist of certificates of deposit and debt securities classified as held-to maturity. Management determines the appropriate classification of debt securities at the time of purchase and reevaluates such designation as of each balance sheet date. Debt securities are classified as held-to-maturity when the Company has the positive intent and ability to hold the securities to maturity. Held-to-maturity securities are stated at amortized cost, adjusted for amortization of premiums and accretion of discounts to maturity. Such amortization and accretion are included in investment income. Interest on securities classified as held-to-maturity is included in investment income.

The Company uses the specific identification method to determine the cost basis of securities sold.

Investments are considered to be impaired when a decline in fair value is judged to be other-than-temporary. The Company evaluates an investment for impairment by considering the length of time and extent to which market value has been less than cost or amortized cost, the financial condition and near-term prospects of the issuer as well as specific events or circumstances that may influence the operations of the issuer and the Company’s intent to sell the security or the likelihood that it will be required to sell the security before recovery of the entire amortized cost. Once a decline in fair value is determined to be other-than-temporary, an impairment charge is recorded to investment income/(expense) and a new cost basis in the investment is established.

Fair value of financial instruments

The Company is required to disclose information on all assets and liabilities reported at fair value that enables an assessment of the inputs used in determining the reported fair values. The Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standard Codification (“ASC”) 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, establishes a hierarchy of inputs used when available. Observable inputs are inputs that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on market data obtained from sources independent of the Company. Unobservable inputs are inputs that reflect the Company’s assumptions about the inputs that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability and are developed based on the best information available in the circumstances. The fair value hierarchy applies only to the valuation inputs used in determining the reported fair value of financial instruments and is not a measure of the investment credit quality. The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are described below:

Level 1—Valuations based on unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the Company has the ability to access at the measurement date.

Level 2—Valuations based on quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active or for which all significant inputs are observable, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3—Valuations that require inputs that reflect the Company’s own assumptions that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable.

To the extent that valuation is based on models or inputs that are less observable or unobservable in the market, the determination of fair value requires more judgment. Accordingly, the degree of judgment exercised by the Company in determining fair value is greatest for instruments categorized in Level 3. A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

 

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Revenue recognition

Effective July 1, 2018, the Company adopted the provisions of ASC 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, (“Topic 606”), using the modified retrospective transition method. Under this method, the Company recorded the cumulative effect of initially applying the new standard to all contracts in process as of the date of adoption. This standard applies to all contracts with customers, except for contracts that are within the scope of other standards.

The adoption of the new revenue recognition guidance resulted in an increase of $22.6 million in deferred revenue and accumulated deficit as of July 1, 2018. For the three and nine months ended March 31, 2019, revenue increased by $18.4 million and $25.4 million, respectively, net income increased by $18.4 million and $25.4 million, respectively, basic earnings per share increased by $1.01 per share and $1.40 per share, respectively, diluted earnings per share increased by $1.00 per share and $1.38, respectively, based on revenue recognition under Topic 606 as compared to the Company’s prior revenue recognition methodology under ASC 605, Revenue Recognition. These changes were primarily caused by the differences in determining and allocating transaction price and recognizing revenue on a proportional performance basis under Topic 606.

The Company may enter into collaboration agreements which are within the scope of Topic 606, under which the Company licenses rights to its technology and certain of the Company’s product candidates and performs research and development services for third parties. The terms of these arrangements typically may include payment of one or more of the following: non-refundable, up-front fees; reimbursement of research and development costs; development, regulatory and commercial milestone payments; and royalties on net sales of licensed products.

Under Topic 606, an entity recognizes revenue when its customer obtains control of promised goods or services, in an amount that reflects the consideration which the entity expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services. To determine the appropriate amount of revenue to be recognized for arrangements determined to be within the scope of Topic 606, the Company performs the following five steps: (i) identification of the contract; (ii) determination of whether the promised goods or services are performance obligations; (iii) measurement of the transaction price, including the constraint on variable consideration; (iv) allocation of the transaction price to the performance obligations; and (v) recognition of revenue when (or as) the Company satisfies each performance obligation. The Company only applies the five-step model to contracts when it is probable that the entity will collect consideration it is entitled to in exchange for the goods or services it transfers to the customer.

Performance obligations are promises to transfer distinct goods or services to the customer. Promised goods or services are considered distinct when (i) the customer can benefit from the good or service on its own or together with other readily available resources and (ii) the promised good or service is separately identifiable from other promises in the contract. In assessing whether promised good or services are distinct, the Company considers factors such as the stage of development of the underlying intellectual property, the capabilities of the customer to develop the intellectual property on their own or whether the required expertise is readily available.

The Company estimates the transaction price based on the amount expected to be received for transferring the promised goods or services in the contract. The consideration may include both fixed consideration or variable consideration. At the inception of an arrangement that includes variable consideration and at each reporting period, the Company evaluates the amount of potential payment and the likelihood that the payments will be received. The Company utilizes either the most likely amount method or expected amount method to estimate the amount to be received based on which method better predicts the amount expected to be received. If it is probable that a significant revenue reversal would not occur, the variable consideration is included in the transaction price. The Company will assess its revenue generating arrangements in order to determine whether a significant financing component exists and conclude that a significant financing component does not exist in any of its arrangements if: (a) the promised consideration approximates the cash selling price of the promised goods and services or any significant difference is due to factors other than financing; and (b) timing of payment approximates the transfer of goods and services and performance is over a relatively short period of time within the context of the entire term of the contract.

The Company’s contracts will often include development and regulatory milestone payments. At contract inception and at each reporting period, the Company evaluates whether the milestones are considered probable of being reached and estimates the amount to be included in the transaction price using the most likely amount method. If it is probable that a significant revenue reversal would not occur, the associated milestone value is included in the transaction price. Milestone payments that are not within the Company’s control or the customer’s control, such as regulatory approvals, are not included in the transaction price. At the end of each subsequent reporting period, the Company re-evaluates the probability of achievement of such development milestones and any related constraint, and if necessary, adjusts its estimate of the overall transaction price. Any such adjustments are recorded on a cumulative catch-up basis, which would affect collaboration revenues and earnings in the period of adjustment.

 

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For arrangements that may include sales-based royalties, including milestone payments based on the level of sales, and the license is deemed to be the predominant item to which the royalties relate, the Company recognizes revenue at the later of (i) when the related sales occur, or (ii) when the performance obligation to which some or all of the royalty has been allocated has been satisfied (or partially satisfied). To date, the Company has not recognized any royalty revenue resulting from any of the Company’s collaboration arrangements.

The Company allocates the transaction price based on the estimated standalone selling price of the underlying performance obligations or in the case of certain variable consideration to one or more performance obligations. The Company must develop assumptions that require judgment to determine the stand-alone selling price for each performance obligation identified in the contract. The Company utilizes key assumptions to determine the stand-alone selling price, which may include other comparable transactions, pricing considered in negotiating the transaction and the estimated costs to complete the respective performance obligation. Certain variable consideration is allocated specifically to one or more performance obligations in a contract when the terms of the variable consideration relate to the satisfaction of the performance obligation and the resulting amounts allocated to each performance obligation are consistent with the amounts the Company would expect to receive for each performance obligation.

For performance obligations consisting of licenses and other promises, the Company utilizes judgment to assess the nature of the combined performance obligation to determine whether the combined performance obligation is satisfied over time or at a point in time and, if over time, the appropriate method of measuring progress for purposes of recognizing revenue from non-refundable, up-front fees. The Company evaluates the measure of progress each reporting period and, if necessary, adjusts the measure of performance and related revenue recognition. If the license to the Company’s intellectual property is determined to be distinct from the other performance obligations identified in the arrangement, the Company will recognize revenue from non-refundable, up-front fees allocated to the license when the license is transferred to the customer and the customer is able to use and benefit from the license.

The Company receives payments from its customers based on billing terms established in each contract. Such billings generally have 30-day payment terms. Upfront payments and fees are recorded as deferred revenue upon receipt or when due until the Company performs its obligations under these arrangements. Amounts are recorded as accounts receivable when the right to consideration is unconditional.

Income taxes

The Company uses the asset and liability method for accounting for income taxes. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the estimated future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective income tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled.

The Tax Cut and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”) was enacted on December 22, 2017. The Tax Act contains several key provisions including, among other things, reducing the U.S. federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%. In addition, federal net operating losses (“NOLs”) will be carried forward indefinitely and will be subject to an 80% utilization against taxable income. The Company has enacted the reduction in tax rate effective January 1, 2018, which resulted in a decrease to the deferred tax asset and a decrease to the valuation allowance. During the second quarter of fiscal 2019, the measurement period provided by SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin 118 closed and the Company did not make any other adjustments to the provisional estimates recorded in prior periods. Although the measurement period has closed, further technical guidance related to the Tax Act, including final regulations on a broad range of topics, is expected to be issued. In accordance with ASC 740, the Company will recognize any effects of the guidance in the period that such guidance is issued.

As required by U.S. GAAP, the Company recognizes the financial statement benefit of a tax position only after determining that the relevant tax authority would more likely than not sustain the position following an audit. For tax positions meeting the more-likely-than-not threshold, the amount recognized in the financial statements is the largest benefit that has a greater than 50 percent likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement with the relevant tax authority. Any interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions will be reflected in income tax expense. The Company is subject to examination of its income tax returns in the federal and state income tax jurisdictions in which it operates. On December 28, 2015, the United States Internal Revenue Service, or IRS, notified the Company of an income tax audit for the tax period ending June 30, 2014. As of June 30, 2017, the IRS audit was closed, and the Company incurred no penalties or payment liabilities for its income tax positions.

 

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For the nine months ended March 31, 2019, the Company’s tax expense included an increase in the uncertain tax position liability of $57,000 related to interest on the uncertain tax position. The uncertain tax position liability as of March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018 was $2,016,000 and $1,959,000, respectively.

Research and development

Research and development costs include costs incurred in identifying, developing and testing product candidates and generally comprise compensation and related benefits and non-cash share-based compensation to research related employees; laboratory costs; animal and laboratory maintenance and supplies; rent; utilities; clinical and pre-clinical expenses; and payments for sponsored research, scientific and regulatory consulting fees and testing.

As part of the process of preparing its financial statements, the Company is required to estimate its accrued expenses. This process involves reviewing quotations and contracts, identifying services that have been performed on its behalf and estimating the level of service performed and the associated cost incurred for services for which the Company has not yet been invoiced or otherwise notified of the actual cost. The majority of the Company’s service providers invoice the Company monthly in arrears for services performed or when contractual milestones are met. The Company makes estimates of its accrued expenses as of each balance sheet date in its financial statements based on facts and circumstances known to it at that time. The significant estimates in the Company’s accrued research and development expenses are related to expenses incurred with respect to academic research centers, contract research organizations, and other vendors in connection with research and development activities for which it has not yet been invoiced.

There may be instances in which the Company’s service providers require advance payments at the inception of a contract or in which payments made to these vendors will exceed the level of services provided, resulting in a prepayment of the research and development expense. Such prepayments are charged to research and development expense as and when the service is provided or when a specific milestone outlined in the contract is reached.

Prepayments related to research and development activities were $1.4 million and $1.0 million at March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018, respectively, and are included within the prepaid and other current assets line item in these Unaudited Condensed Balance Sheets.

Share-based compensation

The Company accounts for share-based awards issued to employees in accordance with ASC 718, Compensation—Stock Compensation and generally recognizes share-based compensation expense on a straight-line basis over the periods during which the employees are required to provide service in exchange for the award. In addition, the Company issues stock options and restricted shares of common stock to non-employees in exchange for consulting services and accounts for these in accordance with the provisions of ASC Subtopic 505-50, Equity-Based Payments to Non-employees (“ASC 505-50”). Under ASC 505-50, share-based awards to non-employees are subject to periodic fair value re-measurement over their vesting terms.

For purposes of calculating stock-based compensation, the Company estimates the fair value of stock options using a Black-Scholes option-pricing model. The determination of the fair value of share-based payment awards utilizing the Black-Scholes model is affected by the Company’s stock price and a number of assumptions, including expected volatility, expected life, risk-free interest rate and expected dividends. Historically, the expected volatility was primarily based on the historical volatility of peer company data. For the three and nine months ended March 31, 2019, the expected volatility is based on the historical volatility of the company stock price. If the Company had used peer company data for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2019, share-based compensation expense for the reporting period would have differed by an insignificant amount. The expected life of the stock options is based on historical and other economic data trended into the future. The risk-free interest rate assumption is based on observed interest rates appropriate for the expected terms of the Company’s stock options. The dividend yield assumption is based on the Company’s history and expectation of no dividend payouts. If factors change and the Company employs different assumptions, stock-based compensation expense may differ significantly from what has been recorded in the past. If there is a difference between the assumptions used in determining stock-based compensation expense and the actual factors which become known over time, specifically with respect to anticipated forfeitures, the Company may change the input factors used in determining stock-based compensation costs for future grants. These changes, if any, may materially impact the Company’s results of operations in the period such changes are made.

 

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Net earnings/(loss) per share

Basic net earnings/(loss) per share is calculated by dividing net loss by the weighted average shares outstanding during the period, without consideration for common stock equivalents. Diluted net earnings/(loss) per share is calculated by adjusting weighted average shares outstanding for the dilutive effect of common stock equivalents outstanding for the period, determined using the treasury-stock method. For purposes of the diluted net loss per share calculation, stock options are considered to be common stock equivalents. The dilutive impact of stock options for the three-and nine-month periods ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 totaled 0.2 million shares. The dilutive impact of stock options has been excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per share for the for the three-and nine-month periods ended March 31, 2018, as their effect would be anti-dilutive. Therefore, for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2018, basic and diluted net loss per share are the same.

Comprehensive income/(loss)

Comprehensive income/(loss) consists of net income/(loss) and changes in equity during a period from transactions and other equity and circumstances generated from non-owner sources. The Company’s net loss equals comprehensive loss for all periods presented.

New accounting pronouncements

Adopted in the current period

Revenue recognition

In May 2014, Topic 606, which replaces the existing accounting standards for revenue recognition with a single comprehensive five-step model. The core principle is to recognize revenue upon the transfer of goods or services to customers at an amount that reflects the consideration expected to be received. It also requires enhanced disclosures about revenue, provides guidance for transactions that were not previously addressed comprehensively, and improves guidance for multiple-element arrangements. The guidance was effective for public companies for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017 as well as interim periods within those annual periods using either the full retrospective approach or modified retrospective approach. The Company adopted the new standard effective July 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective approach. Refer to Note 6 for the impact of adoption.

Share-Based Compensation

In May 2017, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2017-09, Scope of Modification Accounting, which amends ASC Topic 718, Compensation—Stock Compensation. The standard provides guidance about which changes to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award require an entity to apply modification accounting in Topic 718. The amendment is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years and early adoption is permitted. The Company has adopted this standard in the first quarter of fiscal 2019 and it did not have a material effect on its financial statements.

Financial Instrument Accounting

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-01, Financial Instruments—Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities. The new standard amends certain aspects of accounting and disclosure requirements of financial instruments, including the requirement that equity investments with readily determinable fair values be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in the results of operations. The new standard was effective July 1, 2018. The Company adopted ASU No. 2016-01 in the first quarter of 2019. The adoption of the new standard did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial position and results of operations.

 

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To be adopted in future periods

Leases

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). The new accounting guidance will require the recognition of all long-term lease assets and lease liabilities by lessees and sets forth new disclosure requirements for those lease assets and liabilities. The standard requires lessees to recognize right-of-use assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet using a modified retrospective approach at the beginning of the earliest comparative period in the financial statements. The FASB subsequently issued several ASUs amending the new standard. This standard will be effective for the Company on July 1, 2019. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the potential impact on its financial position and results of operations of adopting this guidance. The Company expects the adoption of this new standard to have a material impact on total assets and total liabilities within the Company’s Condensed Balance Sheet, with no material impact on the Condensed Statement of Operations.

Share-Based Compensation

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-07, Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting. The new standard aligns the measurement and classification guidance for share-based payments to nonemployees with the guidance for share-based payments to employees, with certain exceptions. Under the guidance, the measurement of equity-classified nonemployee awards will be fixed at the grant date, which may lower their cost and reduce volatility in the income statement. The standard will be effective for the Company on July 1, 2020. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently in the process of evaluating the impact of adoption of this standard on its financial statements.

Fair Value Measurement

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework—Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement. The new standard eliminates, adds and modifies certain disclosure requirements for fair value measurement as part of its disclosure framework project. The amount and reasons for transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy will no longer be required to be disclosed, but public companies will be required to disclose the range and weighted average used to develop significant unobservable inputs for Level 3 fair value measurements. This standard will be effective for the Company on July 1, 2020. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

Collaborative Arrangements

In November 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-18, Collaborative Arrangements (Topic 808): Clarifying the Interaction between Topic 808 and Topic 606. The new standard clarifies that certain transactions between participants in a collaborative arrangement should be accounted for under ASC 606 when the counterparty is a customer. It precludes an entity from presenting consideration from a transaction in a collaborative arrangement as revenue from contracts with customers if the counterparty is not a customer for that transaction. The guidance amends ASC 808 to refer to the unit-of-account guidance in ASC 606 and requires it to be used only when assessing whether a transaction is in the scope of ASC 606. This standard will be effective for the Company on July 1, 2021. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

3.

Share-based Compensation Plans:

The Company uses stock options and awards of restricted stock to provide long-term incentives for its employees, non-employee directors and certain consultants. The Company has two equity compensation plans under which awards are currently authorized for issuance, the 2013 Employee Stock Purchase Plan and the 2013 Equity and Incentive Plan. No awards have been issued to date under the 2013 Employee Stock Purchase Plan and all of the 128,571 shares previously authorized under this plan remain available for issuance.

 

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A summary of the stock option and restricted stock activity for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 is as follows:

 

     Nine Months ended March 31,  
     2019      2018  

(In thousands, except per share amounts)

   Shares      Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
     Shares      Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
 

Outstanding as of June 30,

     3,107      $ 10.93        2,714      $ 12.96  

Granted

     1,126        4.53        819        4.75  

Exercised

     (29      4.52        (18      0.35  

Forfeited

     (302      7.21        (401      9.89  

Expired

     (200      13.17        (18      15.81  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Outstanding as of March 31,

     3,702      $ 9.22        3,096      $ 11.24  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Exercisable as of March 31,

     2,170           1,862     
  

 

 

       

 

 

    

Weighted average fair value of options granted during the period

   $ 2.91         $ 3.43     
  

 

 

       

 

 

    

The fair value of each option granted is estimated on the grant date using the Black-Scholes stock option pricing model. The following assumptions were made in estimating fair value:

 

     Nine Months ended March 31,  
     2019     2018  

Dividend yield

     0.00     0.00

Expected term

     6.00 – 6.25 years       6.25 years  

Risk-free interest rate

     2.27 – 3.11     1.83 – 2.21

Expected Volatility

     69.22     83.53

For the three and nine months ended March 31, 2019, share-based compensation expense related to stock options and restricted stock awarded to employees, non-employee directors and consultants amounted to approximately $0.8 million and $3.1 million, respectively, compared to $1.2 million and $4.1 million, respectively, for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2018. As of March 31, 2019, there was $5.3 million of unrecognized compensation expense related to non-vested stock options and restricted stock.

 

4.

Investments:

Cash in excess of immediate requirements is invested in accordance with the Company’s investment policy that primarily seeks to maintain adequate liquidity and preserve capital.

The net carrying amounts of the Company’s investments by category are as follows:

 

In thousands

   As of March 31,
2019
     As of June 30,
2018
 

Investments:

     

Certificates of deposit

   $ —      $ 2,106  

Debt securities—held-to-maturity (due in one year or less)

     67,665        71,734  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total investments

   $ 67,665      $ 73,840  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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A summary of the Company’s debt securities classified as held-to-maturity is as follows:

 

     As of March 31, 2019  

In thousands

   Amortized
Cost
     Gross
Unrealized
Gains
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
 

Investments:

           

U.S. government and agency obligations

   $ 67,665      $ 16      $ —        $ 67,681  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total investments

   $ 67,665      $ 16      $ —        $ 67,681  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     As of June 30, 2018  

In thousands

   Amortized
Cost
     Gross
Unrealized
Gains
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
 

Investments:

           

U.S. government and agency obligations

   $ 69,731      $ —        $ (60    $ 69,671  

Corporate obligations

     2,003        —          (1      2,002  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total investments

   $ 71,734      $ —        $ (61    $ 71,673  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The Company believes that the unrealized losses disclosed above were primarily driven by interest rate changes rather than by unfavorable changes in the credit ratings associated with these securities and as a result, the Company continues to expect to collect the principal and interest due on its debt securities that have an amortized cost in excess of fair value. At each reporting period, the Company evaluates securities for impairment when the fair value of the investment is less than its amortized cost. The Company evaluated the underlying credit quality and credit ratings of the issuers, noting neither a significant deterioration since purchase nor other factors leading to other-than-temporary impairment.

 

5.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments and Investments:

Certain assets and liabilities are measured at fair value in the Company’s financial statements or have fair values disclosed in the notes to the financial statements. These assets and liabilities are classified into one of three levels of a hierarchy defined by GAAP. The Company’s assessment of the significance of a particular item to the fair value measurement in its entirety requires judgment, including the consideration of inputs specific to the asset or liability.

The following methods and assumptions were used to estimate the fair value and determine the fair value hierarchy classification of each class of financial instrument included in the table below.

Cash and Cash Equivalents. The carrying value of cash and cash equivalents approximates fair value as maturities are less than three months.

Certificates of Deposit. The Company’s certificates of deposit are placed through an account registry service. The fair value measurement of the Company’s certificates of deposit is considered Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy as the inputs are based on quoted prices for identical assets in markets that are not active. The carrying amounts of the Company’s certificates of deposit reported in the Unaudited Condensed Balance Sheets approximate fair value.

Debt securities—held-to-maturity. The Company’s investments in debt securities classified as held-to-maturity generally include U.S. Treasury Securities, government agency obligations, and corporate obligations. U.S. Treasury Securities are valued using quoted market prices. Valuation adjustments are not applied. Accordingly, U.S. Treasury Securities are considered Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy. The fair values of U.S. government agency obligations and corporate obligations are generally determined using recently executed transactions, broker quotes, market price quotations where these are available or other observable market inputs for the same or similar securities. As such, the Company classifies its investments in U.S. government agency obligations and corporate obligations within Level 1 or Level 2 of the hierarchy, depending on the information used to determine the fair values.

 

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The following fair value hierarchy table presents information about each major category of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis:

 

In thousands

  
(Level 1)
    
(Level 2)
    
(Level 3)
     Total Fair
Value
 

March 31, 2019

           

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 21,570      $ —        $ —        $ 21,570  

Held-to-maturity investments:

           

U.S. government and agency obligations

     67,681        —          —          67,681  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 89,251      $ —        $ —        $ 89,251  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

June 30, 2018

           

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 31,065      $ —        $ —        $ 31,065  

Certificates of deposit

     —          2,100        —          2,100  

Held-to-maturity investments:

           

Corporate obligations

     —          2,002        —          2,002  

U.S. government and agency obligations

     69,671        —          —          69,671  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 100,736      $ 4,102      $ —        $ 104,838  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

6.

Collaboration Agreements

Biogen

On July 1, 2015, the Company entered into a Collaboration Agreement (the “Collaboration Agreement”), a Manufacturing License and Technology Transfer Agreement (the “Manufacturing Agreement”), and the Common Stock Purchase Agreement (the “Equity Agreement”) with Biogen (collectively, the “Biogen Agreement”), pursuant to which the Company and Biogen collaborated to develop, seek regulatory approval for and commercialize gene therapy products to treat XLRS, XLRP, and discovery programs targeting three indications based on the Company’s adeno-associated virus vector technologies. Effective March 8, 2019, Biogen terminated the Collaboration Agreement.

Under the Collaboration Agreement, the Company granted to Biogen with respect to the XLRS and XLRP programs, and upon exercise of the option for the applicable discovery program, an exclusive, royalty-bearing license, with the right to grant sublicenses, to use adeno-associated virus vector technology and other technology controlled by the Company for the licensed products or discovery programs developed under the Collaboration Agreements. Biogen and the Company also granted each other worldwide licenses, with the right to grant sublicenses, of their respective interests in other intellectual property developed under the collaboration outside the licensed products or discovery programs. Biogen pre-funded the Company to conduct all development activities through the completion of a first in human trial for the XLRS program and all development activities through the date that the Investigational New Drug Application (“IND”) becomes effective and the completion of a natural history study for the XLRP program. In addition, Biogen pre-funded the Company to conduct discovery, research and development activities for additional drug candidates through the stage of clinical candidate designation for discovery programs targeting three indications (of which one indication has two development plans at contract inception), after which, Biogen may exercise an option to continue to develop, seek regulatory approval for and commercialize the designated clinical candidate. The pre-funded research and development activities for each program are referred to as “Pre-Funded Activities”. Biogen will reimburse the Company on a full-time equivalent (“FTE”) basis for any additional expenses related to development activities that the Company incurs (“Post-Funded Activities”).

In February 2016, the Company announced Biogen’s selection of adrenoleukodystrophy as the non-ophthalmic indication of the discovery programs. Under the terms of the Collaboration Agreement, the Company, in part through its participation in joint committees with Biogen, would participate in overseeing the development and commercialization of these specific programs.

Pursuant to the Manufacturing Agreement, Biogen may elect an option to receive a manufacturing license for up to six genes for a fixed fee per gene elected. If exercised, the Company becomes eligible to receive certain event milestones and royalties.

Under the Collaboration Agreement, the Company was paid an upfront nonrefundable fee of $94.0 million of which $58.4 million was contractually described as relating to the Pre-Funded Activities (“Pre-Funded Amounts”) and $35.6 million was contractually described as relating to the access of licenses. In addition, under the terms of the Equity Agreement, Biogen purchased 1,453,957 shares of the Company’s common stock at a price of $20.63 per share, for an aggregate cash purchase price of $30.0 million of which $10.8 million was considered to be allocated consideration as part of the Collaboration Agreement. The shares issued to Biogen represented approximately 8.1% of the Company’s outstanding common stock on a post-issuance basis, calculated on the number of shares that were outstanding at June 30, 2015, and constitute restricted securities that may not be resold by Biogen other than in a transaction registered under, or pursuant to an exemption from the registration requirements of, the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

 

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The Company was also eligible to receive total payments of up to $472.5 million based on the successful achievement of future milestones under its XLRS and XLRP programs. For XLRS, the Company was eligible to receive up to: (i) $45.0 million in milestone payments based upon the successful achievement of clinical milestones (relating to dosing in specified trials), (ii) $155.0 million in milestone payments based upon the achievement of regulatory approvals and first commercial sale in specified territories and (iii) $65.0 million in milestone payments based upon the achievement of worldwide sales targets. For the XLRS program, the Company had an option to share development costs and profits after the initial clinical trial data were available instead of receiving milestone payments. For XLRP, the Company was eligible to receive up to: (i) $42.5 million in milestone payments based upon successful achievement of clinical milestones (relating to dosing in specified trials), (ii) $102.5 million in milestone payments based upon the achievement of regulatory approvals and first commercial sale in specified territories and (iii) $62.5 million in milestone payments based upon the achievement of worldwide sales targets. For the XLRP program, the Company had an option to share development costs and profits after the initial clinical trial data were available instead of receiving milestone payments. In addition, the Company was eligible to receive payments of up to $592.5 million based on the exercise of the option for and the successful achievement of future milestones under its discovery programs. Each discovery program was categorized as Category A, Category B or Category C depending on the nature of the indication it sought to address. For Category A, the Company was eligible to receive payments of up to: (i) $20.0 million based upon the successful achievement of clinical milestones (relating to dosing in specified trials) and (ii) $70.0 million in milestone payments based upon the achievement of regulatory approvals and first commercial sale in specified territories. For Category B, the Company was eligible to receive payments of up to: (i) $27.5 million based upon the successful achievement of clinical milestones (relating to dosing in specified trials) and (ii) $105.0 million in milestone payments based upon the achievement of regulatory approvals and first commercial sale in specified territories. For Category C, the Company was eligible to receive payments of up to: (i) $40.0 million based upon the successful achievement of clinical milestones (relating to dosing in specified trials) and (ii) $140.0 million in milestone payments based upon the achievement of regulatory approvals and first commercial sale in specified territories. Under certain limited circumstances, if there were discovery products from more than one discovery program in any of Category A, Category B or Category C, then the milestone payments under the applicable category would have been payable for the applicable discovery product from each such discovery program to achieve the specified milestones.

Biogen would also pay revenue-based royalties for each licensed product at tiered rates ranging from high-single digit to mid-teen percentages of annual net sales of the XLRS or XLRP products and at rates ranging from mid-single digit to low-teen percentages of annual net sales for the discovery products.

Prior to 2018, the Company received a $5.0 million milestone payment related to initial dosing of a XLRS patient. In April 2018, the Company triggered a $2.5 million milestone payment related to the initial dosing of a XLRP patient. In July 2018, the Company triggered a $10.0 million milestone payment related to the treatment of a first patient of second cohort in a Phase 1/2 Clinical XLRP Study.

While the Company recognized additional revenue as it continued to perform under the Collaboration Agreement prior to March 8, 2019, the termination date of the agreement, the Company will not receive any milestone-based or royalty payments under the Collaboration Agreement after its termination.

Accounting Analysis

For the periods prior to July 1, 2018, the Company applied the provisions of ASC 605 in accounting for this arrangement. Refer to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2018, filed with the SEC on September 11, 2018, for the accounting analysis under these provisions.

Under ASC 605 and Topic 606, the Company has concluded that the Collaboration Agreement, the Manufacturing Agreement and the Equity Agreement should be accounted for as one arrangement as the agreements were with the same party and were negotiated and executed contemporaneously.

 

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The performance obligations and the allocated transaction price as of the date of initial application of Topic 606 are as follows:

 

In thousands

   Allocated
Transaction Price
 

XLRS License and Pre-Funded Activities

   $ 52,060  

XLRP License and Pre-Funded Activities

     43,570  

Pre-Funded Activities associated with the Discovery Programs

     16,700  
  

 

 

 
   $ 112,330  
  

 

 

 

The Pre-Funded Activities associated with the Discovery Programs amount is comprised of four distinct performance obligations based on the separate development plans for discovery candidates at contract inception. The Company concluded that the delivered license was not distinct from the Pre-Funded Activities as Biogen cannot obtain the benefit of the license without the related services. Further, each of the license and related Pre-Funded Activities performance obligation is considered a distinct performance obligation as each development plan is pursued independent of every other development plan.

The Company concluded that Post-Funded Activities represent customer options that are not material rights as any services requested by Biogen and provided by the Company are reimbursed at a rate that reflects the estimated standalone selling price for the services. As such, the Company will recognize revenue related to Post-Funded Activities as the services are provided. Through the date of adoption of ASC 606, the Company has recognized revenue of $4.7 million for Post-Funded Activities. The Company recorded revenue of $0.8 million and $2.7 million in the three- and nine-months period ended March 31, 2019 related to Post-Funded Activities.

The Company concluded that the option to receive i) commercial licenses for the Discovery Programs that achieve clinical candidate designation, as defined in the Collaboration Agreement and ii) manufacturing licenses for up to six genes pursuant to the Manufacturing Agreement represent customer options that are not material rights as the exercise price for such options reflects the estimated standalone selling price for such option. As such, the Company will account for such option if and when the options are exercised.

As of the date of the initial application of Topic 606, the total transaction price for the Biogen Agreement was $112.3 million which included a $5.0 million milestone payment for initiation of dosing of XLRS and a $2.5 million milestone payment for initiation of dosing of XLRP. The Company used the most-likely method to determine the amount of variable consideration in the Biogen Agreement. The Company believes that any estimated amount of variable consideration related to clinical and regulatory milestone payments should be fully constrained as the achievement of such milestones was highly susceptible to factors outside of the Company’s control. The Company determined that the commercial milestones and sales-based royalties would be recognized when the related sales occurred as they were deemed to relate predominately to the license granted and therefore were also excluded from the transaction price.

In the quarter ended September 30, 2018, the Company received a $10.0 million milestone payment related to XLRP which increased the transaction price. Based on an understanding between the parties in the quarter ended September 30, 2018, the Company also reallocated $1.1 million of Pre-Funded Amounts to cover Post-Funded Activities which resulted in a decrease to the transaction price and deferred revenue of $1.1 million in the quarter ended September 30, 2018. Additionally, the Company reallocated $1.8 million of variable consideration between Pre-Funded Activities associated with Discovery program performance obligations based on changes to the underlying development plans of the product candidates. The total transaction price did not change in the quarter ended March 31, 2019.

The reallocation between Discovery Programs generated an insignificant cumulative catch up adjustment to revenue in the quarter ended September 30, 2018. The cumulative catch-up adjustment to revenue that relate to changes or reallocations of the transaction price are further discussed in the Summary of Contract Assets and Liabilities section below.

The transaction price was allocated to the performance obligations based on the relative estimated standalone selling price of each performance obligation or, in the case of certain variable consideration, to one or more performance obligations. The estimated standalone selling prices for performance obligations, that include a license and Pre-Funded Activities, were developed using the estimated selling price of the license and an estimate of the overall effort to perform the Pre-Funded Activities. The estimated selling price of the licenses were determined using a discounted cash flow valuation utilizing forecasted revenues and costs for the Company’s product candidate licenses.

 

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The Company recognized revenue related to the performance obligations which included a license and Pre-Funded Activities over the estimated period of the research and development services using a proportional performance model. The Company measured proportional performance based on the costs incurred relative to the total costs expected to be incurred to satisfy the performance obligation. Management believes that recognizing revenue on a proportional performance basis based on costs incurred faithfully depicts the transfer of goods and services to the customer because the customer consumed the Company’s services as such services were performed. The Company accounted for the termination of the Collaboration Agreement upon the effective date of the termination and updated its total costs incurred to satisfy the performance obligations as of March 31, 2019; including any impact of the termination.

During the three and nine months ended March 31, 2019 the Company recorded revenue of $21.2 million and $41.1 million, respectively, related to its efforts under the Biogen Agreement as compared to recorded revenue of $3.6 million and $18.7 million, respectively, for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2018. The Company has net accounts receivable balances of $0.8 million and $1.7 million as of March 31, 2019 and June 30, 2018, respectively, related to the Biogen Agreement. As a result of the termination of the Collaboration Agreement with Biogen effective March 8, 2019, the Company recognized revenue of $20.4 million, which was the remaining deferred revenue balance as of termination date. Therefore, as of March 31, 2019, the Company had no deferred revenue related to the Biogen Agreement. For further details regarding deferred revenue, refer to Summary of Contract Assets and Liabilities section.

The Company’s revenue is comprised of the following related to the Biogen Agreement:

 

     Three
Months Ended
March 31,
     Nine Months
Ended March 31,
 

In thousands

   2019      2018      2019      2018  

Collaboration revenue

           

Licenses and related services

   $ 18,019      $ 2,844      $ 27,000      $ 16,333  

Development services

     775        744        2,736        2,394  

Milestone revenue

     2,413        —          11,392        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total collaboration revenue

   $ 21,207      $ 3,588        41,128      $ 18,727  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

License and related services revenue is comprised of revenue related to the Company’s completion of performance obligations that contain the delivery of licenses and Pre-Funded Activities. Development services revenue relates to the delivery of Post Funded Activities. Milestone revenue relates to the portion of milestone payments received that are recognized as revenue based on the proportional performance of the underlying performance obligation and revenue recognized due to the termination of the Collaboration Agreement.

Summary of Contract Assets and Liabilities

The following table presents changes in the balances of our contract assets and liabilities during the nine months ended March 31, 2019:

 

In thousands

   June 30, 2018      Additions      Deductions      March 31, 2019  

Contract assets

   $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —    

Contract liabilities:

           

Deferred revenue

   $ 29,521      $ 10,000      $ 39,521      $ —    

Additions for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 include the $10 million milestone payment received associated with the XLRP program. For the three months and nine months ended March 31, 2019, the Company recognized revenue of $19.9 million and $29.5 million, respectively, related to deferred revenue that existed as of June 30, 2018.

 

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ITEM 2.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis provides an overview of our financial condition as of March 31, 2019, and results of operations for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018. This discussion should be read in conjunction with the accompanying Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements and accompanying notes, as well as our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2018, (“June 2018 Form 10-K”). In addition to historical financial information, the following discussion contains forward-looking statements that reflect our plans, estimates, assumptions and beliefs. Our actual results could differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to these differences include those discussed below and elsewhere in this report as well as those set forth in Part I, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” of the June 2018 Form 10-K. Forward-looking statements include information concerning our possible or assumed future results of operations, business strategies and operations, financing plans, potential growth opportunities, potential market opportunities and the effects of competition. Forward-looking statements include all statements that are not historical facts and can be identified by terms such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “could,” “seeks,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “plans,” “potential,” “predicts,” “projects,” “should,” “will,” “would” or similar expressions and the negatives of those terms. Given these uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Also, forward-looking statements represent our management’s plans, estimates, assumptions and beliefs only as of the date of this report. Except as required by law, we assume no obligation to update these forward-looking statements publicly or to update the reasons actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future.

As used herein, except as otherwise indicated by context, references to “we,” “us,” “our,” or the “Company” refer to Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation.

Overview

We are a clinical-stage biotechnology company that uses a proprietary gene therapy platform to develop transformational genetic therapies for patients suffering from rare and debilitating diseases. Our initial focus is in the field of ophthalmology, where we have active clinical programs in X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), achromatopsia (ACHM) and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), and a preclinical program in optogenetics. In addition to ophthalmology, we have initiated preclinical programs in adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) and otology. With a number of important clinical milestones on the horizon, we believe we are well positioned to advance multiple programs towards pivotal studies. In addition to our product pipeline, we have also developed broad technological capabilities through our collaborations with Synpromics Limited (Synpromics) and the University of Florida, which provide us with expertise in vector design and manufacturing as well as synthetic promoter development and optimization.

Since our inception in 1999, we have devoted substantially all of our resources to development efforts relating to our proof-of-concept programs in ophthalmology and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, or AAT deficiency, an inherited orphan lung disease, including activities to manufacture product in compliance with good manufacturing practices, preparing to conduct and conducting clinical trials of our product candidates, providing general and administrative support for these operations and protecting our intellectual property. We do not have any products approved for sale and have not generated any revenue from product sales. We have funded our operations to date primarily through public offering of our common stock, private placement of preferred stock, and collaborations. We have also been the recipient, either independently or with our collaborators, of grant funding administered through federal, state, and local governments and agencies, including the United States Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, and by patient advocacy groups such as The Foundation Fighting Blindness, or FFB, and the Alpha-1 Foundation.

We have incurred losses from operations in each year since inception except for fiscal 2017 and for the nine months ended March 31, 2019. Our net income for the nine-month period ended March 31, 2019 was $8.5 million while the net loss for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2018 was $21.3 million, compared to net income of $0.4 million and net loss of $1.4 million for each of the fiscal years ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. Substantially all our net losses resulted from costs incurred in connection with our research and development programs and from general and administrative costs associated with our operations. We expect to continue to incur significant operating expenses for at least the next several years and anticipate that such expenses will increase substantially in connection with our ongoing activities, as we:

 

   

conduct clinical trials for our XLRS, ACHM and XLRP product candidates;

 

   

continue our research and development efforts, including exploration through early preclinical studies of potential applications of our gene therapy platform in:

 

   

orphan ophthalmology indications;

 

   

non-orphan ophthalmology indications including wet AMD and other inherited retinal diseases; and

 

   

other inherited diseases, such as otology and CNS indications.

 

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manufacture clinical trial materials and develop larger-scale manufacturing capabilities;

 

   

seek regulatory approval for our product candidates;

 

   

further develop our gene therapy platform;

 

   

add personnel to support our collaboration, product development and commercialization efforts; and

 

   

continue to operate as a public company.

As of March 31, 2019, we had cash and cash equivalents and investments totaling $89.2 million.

We do not expect to generate revenue from product sales unless and until we successfully complete development and obtain regulatory approval for one or more of our product candidates, which we expect will take a number of years and which we believe is subject to significant uncertainty. We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents and investments as of March 31, 2019, will be sufficient to allow us to generate data from our ongoing clinical programs, to move our pre-clinical optogenetic program in collaboration with Bionic Sight into the clinic and to fund our currently planned research and discovery programs for approximately two years. In order to complete the process of obtaining regulatory approval for our lead product candidates and to build the sales, marketing and distribution infrastructure that we believe will be necessary to commercialize our lead product candidates, if approved, we will require substantial additional funding. Also, our current operating plan may change as a result of many factors currently unknown to us, and we may need to seek additional funds sooner than planned, through public or private equity or debt financings, government or other third-party funding, marketing and distribution arrangements and other collaborations, strategic alliances and licensing arrangements or a combination of these approaches. However, we may be unable to raise additional funds or enter into such other arrangements when needed on favorable terms or at all. Our failure to raise capital or enter into such other arrangements as and when needed would have a negative impact on our financial condition and our ability to develop our products.

On December 7, 2018, we received written notice from Biogen MA Inc. (Biogen), a wholly owned subsidiary of Biogen Inc., that Biogen has elected to terminate the Collaboration and License Agreement between Biogen and us effective as of March 8, 2019. Upon the termination of the Collaboration Agreement, we received back the exclusive license rights to develop, manufacture and commercialize the product candidates for all of our partnered programs including our XLRP program, XLRS program and our three discovery programs. As we reported on December 12, 2018, based on topline interim six-month data from our Phase 1/2 clinical trial of our XLRS product candidate that showed no clinical activity at six-months, we will complete patient monitoring activities on the XLRS program according to the clinical protocol, but we will not further develop our XLRS product candidate. We plan to continue to advance our XLRP and ACHM product candidates, as we believe the general safety and tolerability of our gene delivery platform is supported by our XLRS clinical data, and we are evaluating next steps for our discovery programs.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based on our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities in our financial statements. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates and judgments, including those related to accrued expenses and share-based compensation. We base our estimates on historical experience, known trends and events, and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

For a description of our accounting policies that, in our opinion, involve the most significant application of judgment or involve complex estimation and which could, if different judgments or estimates were made, materially affect our reported results of operations, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” in our June 2018 Form 10-K, for the year ended June 30, 2018.

The Company adopted Topic 606 on July 1, 2018. See Note 2 to these Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for a description of our revenue recognition accounting policies.

New Accounting Pronouncements

Refer to Note 2 to these Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements included in this quarterly report for further information on recently issued accounting standards.

 

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Financial operations review

Revenue

We primarily generate revenue through collaboration agreements, sponsored research arrangements with nonprofit organizations for the development and commercialization of product candidates and from federal research and development grant programs. The Collaboration Agreement with Biogen terminated on March 8th, 2019 and as a result of the termination, the Company recognized revenue of $20.4 million for the three-month period ended March 31, 2019. Thereafter, no additional collaboration revenue related to the Collaboration Agreement will be recognized. In the future, we may generate revenue from a combination of product sales, license fees, milestone payments, development services, research and development grants, and from collaboration and royalty payments for the sales of products developed under licenses of our intellectual property. We do not expect to generate revenue from product sales for the foreseeable future, if at all. If we fail to complete the development of our product candidates in a timely manner or obtain regulatory approval for them, our ability to generate future revenue, our results of operations and financial position would be materially adversely affected.

Research and development expenses

Research and development expenses consist primarily of costs incurred for the development of our product candidates, which include:

 

   

employee-related expenses, including salaries, benefits, travel and share-based compensation expense;

 

   

expenses incurred under agreements with academic research centers, contract research organizations, or CROs, and investigative sites that conduct our clinical trials;

 

   

license and sublicense fees and collaboration expenses;

 

   

the cost of acquiring, developing, and manufacturing clinical trial materials; and

 

   

facilities, depreciation, and other expenses, which include direct and allocated expenses for rent and maintenance of facilities, insurance, and other supplies.

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred. Costs for certain development activities are recognized based on an evaluation of the progress to completion of specific tasks using information and data provided to us by our vendors and our clinical sites.

We cannot determine with certainty the duration and completion costs of the current or future clinical trials of our product candidates or if, when, or to what extent we will generate revenues from the commercialization and sale of any of our product candidates that obtain regulatory approval. We may never succeed in achieving regulatory approval for any of our product candidates. The duration, costs, and timing of clinical trials and development of our product candidates will depend on a variety of factors, including:

 

   

the scope, rate of progress, and expense of our ongoing as well as any additional clinical trials and other research and development activities;

 

   

our ability to enter into partnership or collaboration agreements with third parties;

 

   

the timing and level of activity as determined by us or jointly with our partners;

 

   

the level of funding received from our partners;

 

   

whether or not we elect to cost share with our partners;

 

   

the countries in which trials are conducted;

 

   

future clinical trial results;

 

   

uncertainties in clinical trial enrollment rates or drop-out or discontinuation rates of patients;

 

   

potential additional safety monitoring or other studies requested by regulatory agencies or elected as best practice by us;

 

   

increased cost and delay associated with manufacturing or testing issues, including ongoing quality assurance, qualifying new vendors and developing in-house capabilities;

 

   

significant and changing government regulation; and

 

   

the timing and receipt of any regulatory approvals.

 

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A change in the outcome of any of these variables with respect to the development of a product candidate could mean a significant change in the costs and timing associated with the development of that product candidate. For example, if the FDA, or another regulatory authority were to require us to conduct clinical trials beyond those that we currently anticipate will be required for the completion of clinical development of a product candidate or if we experience significant delays in enrollment in or execution of any of our clinical trials, we could be required to expend significant additional financial resources and time on the completion of clinical development.

From inception through March 31, 2019, we have incurred approximately $194.1 million in research and development expenses. We expect our research and development expenses to increase for the foreseeable future as we continue the development of our product candidates and explore potential applications of our gene therapy platform in other indications.

General and administrative expenses

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of salaries and related costs for personnel, including share-based compensation and travel expenses for our employees in executive, operational, legal, business development, finance and human resource functions. Other general and administrative expenses include costs to support employee training and development, board of directors’ costs, depreciation, insurance expenses, facility-related costs not otherwise included in research and development expense, professional fees for legal services, including patent-related expenses, and accounting, investor relations, corporate communications and information technology services. We anticipate that our general and administrative expenses will continue to increase in the future as we hire additional employees to support our continued research and development efforts, collaboration arrangements, and the potential commercialization of our product candidates. Additionally, if and when we believe a regulatory approval of the first product candidate appears likely, we anticipate an increase in payroll and related expenses as a result of our preparation for commercial operations, especially as it relates to the sales and marketing of our product candidates.

Other income/(expense), net

Other income and expense consist primarily of interest earned on cash and cash equivalents and our held-to-maturity investments.

Provision for income taxes

Income tax (expense) benefit for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2019 was ($19,000) and ($57,000), respectively, compared to ($725,000) and $66,000 for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2018, respectively. The income tax expense for the three and nine months ended March 31, 2019, was primarily driven by interest expense related to the Company’s uncertain tax position.

Results of Operations

Comparison of the three months ended March 31, 2019 to the three months ended March 31, 2018

Revenue

 

     Three
Months Ended
March 31,
     Increase      % Increase  

In thousands

   2019      2018      (Decrease)      (Decrease)  

Collaboration revenue

           

License and related services

   $ 18,019      $ 2,844      $ 15,175        534

Development services

     775        744        31        4

Milestone revenue

     2,413        —          2,413        nm
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total collaboration revenue

     21,207        3,588        17,619        491

Grant revenue

     111        15        96        640
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total revenue

   $ 21,318      $ 3,603      $ 17,715        492
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was $21.3 million, compared to $3.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018. The increase was primarily due to increased license and related services revenue of $15.2 million and increased milestone revenue of $2.4 million as a result of the termination of the Collaboration Agreement with Biogen on March 8, 2019.

 

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Research and development expense

The following table summarizes our research and development expenses by product candidate or program for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

     Three
Months Ended
March 31,
     Increase      % Increase  

In thousands

   2019      2018      (Decrease)      (Decrease)  

External research and development expenses

           

ACHM

   $ 1,312      $ 872      $ 440        50

XLRS

     104        669        (565      (84 )% 

XLRP

     736        457        279        61

Research and discovery programs

     505        1,020        (515      (50 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total external research and development expenses

     2,657        3,018        (361      (12 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Internal research and development expenses

           

Employee-related costs

     2,724        2,296        428        19

Share-based compensation

     418        661        (243      (37 )% 

Other

     1,404        1,378        26        2
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total internal research and development expenses

     4,546        4,335        211        5
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total research and development expense

   $ 7,203      $ 7,353      $ (150      (2 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

External research and development costs consist of collaboration, licensing, manufacturing, testing, and other miscellaneous expenses that are directly attributable to our most advanced product candidates and discovery programs. We do not allocate personnel-related costs, including stock-based compensation, costs associated with broad technology platform improvements or other indirect costs, to specific programs, as they are deployed across multiple projects under development and, as such, are separately classified as internal research and development expenses in the table above.

Research and development expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2019 were $7.2 million, compared to $7.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2018, a decrease of $0.2 million, or 2%. The decrease in external spending was primarily due to decreased research and discovery spending associated with our pre-clinical ophthalmology programs and decreased XLRS spending associated with completing enrollment of the XLRS Phase 1/2 trial in April of 2018. The increase in internal spending was primarily due to hiring of additional employees to support clinical trial execution and research and development activities.

General and administrative expense

 

     Three
Months Ended
March 31,
     Increase      % Increase  

In thousands

   2019      2018      (Decrease)      (Decrease)  

Employee-related costs

   $ 1,312      $ 1,397      $ (85      (6 )% 

Share-based compensation

     427        607        (180      (30 )% 

Legal and professional fees

     201        47        154        328

Other

     1,170        1,895        (725      (38 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total general and administrative expense

   $ 3,110      $ 3,946      $ (836      (21 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

General and administrative expense for the three months ended March 31, 2019 decreased by $0.8 million to $3.1 million compared to the same period in 2018. The decrease was primarily driven by lower employee-related costs and share-based based compensation of $0.3 million and lower other general and administrative expenses of $0.7 million attributable to decrease in bad debt expense and other administrative expenses incurred during normal business operation. The decreases were partially offset by $0.2 million increase in legal and professional fees during the three months ended March 31, 2019 compared to the three months ended March 31, 2018.

 

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Comparison of nine months ended March 31, 2019 to the nine months ended March 31, 2018

Revenue

 

     Nine Months Ended
March 31,
     Increase      % Increase  

In thousands

   2019      2018      (Decrease)      (Decrease)  

Collaboration revenue

           

License and related services

   $ 27,000      $ 16,333      $ 10,667        65

Development services

     2,736        2,394        342        14

Milestone revenue

     11,392        —          11,392        nm
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total collaboration revenue

     41,128        18,727        22,401        120

Grant revenue

     158        43        115        267
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total revenue

   $ 41,286      $ 18,770      $ 22,516        120
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total revenue for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 was $41.3 million, compared to $18.8 million for the nine months ended March 31, 2018. The increase was primarily due to increased milestone revenue of $11.4 million, increased license and related service revenue of $10.7 million and increased development services revenue of $0.3 million. The increase in license and related services revenue was primarily due to recognizing revenue of $18.0 million as result of the termination of the Collaboration Agreement with Biogen effective March 8, 2019, partially offset by decreased license and related service revenue, when excluding amounts recognized upon the termination of the Collaboration Agreement, due to the Company’s revised pattern of revenue recognition under ASC 606. The increase in development services revenue was primarily due to additional Phase 1/2 study activities related to the Company’s XLRP program. The increase in milestone revenue was primarily due to recognizing revenue of $8.3 million associated with the receipt of $10.0 million milestone payment from Biogen during the first quarter of fiscal year 2019 and due to recognizing revenue of $2.4 million as a result of the termination of the Collaboration Agreement with Biogen.

Research and development expense

 

    
Nine Months Ended
March 31,
     Increase      % Increase  

In thousands

   2019      2018      (Decrease)      (Decrease)  

External research and development expenses

           

ACHM

   $ 3,309      $ 2,626      $ 683        26

XLRS

     968        2,007        (1,039      (52 )% 

XLRP

     3,831        1,704        2,127        125

Research and discovery programs

     2,540        4,752        (2,212      (47 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total external research and development expenses

     10,648        11,089        (441      (4 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Internal research and development expenses

           

Employee-related costs

     7,937        6,479        1,458        23

Share-based compensation

     1,443        1,850        (407      (22 )% 

Other

     4,823        3,937        886        23
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total internal research and development expenses

     14,203        12,266        1,937        16
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total research and development expense

   $ 24,851      $ 23,355      $ 1,496        6
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Research and development expenses for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 were $24.9 million, compared to $23.4 million for the nine months ended March 31, 2018, an increase of $1.5 million, or 6%. This increase was primarily attributable to:

 

   

$2.1 million of increased external spending related to XLRP primarily due to incurring sublicense expenses associated with receiving a $10 million XLRP milestone payment from Biogen;

 

   

$1.5 million of increased employee-related expenses associated with the hiring of additional employees to support clinical trial execution and research and development activities;

 

   

$0.9 million of increased general research and development expenses associated with consulting, depreciation and rent expense; and

 

   

$0.7 million of increased external spending related to ACHM primarily due to increase in patient enrollment.

These increases were partially offset by:

 

   

$1.0 million of decreased external XLRS expenses primarily due to reaching full enrollment on the Phase 1/2 clinical trial;

 

   

$2.2 million of decreased research and discovery spending primarily due to decreased pre-clinical ophthalmology activities; and

 

   

$0.4 million of decreased share-based compensation expenses primarily due to timing of grants.

General and administrative expense

 

     Nine
Months Ended
March 31,
     Increase      % Increase  

In thousands

   2019      2018      (Decrease)      (Decrease)  

Employee-related costs

   $ 3,635      $ 4,166      $ (531      (13 )% 

Share-based compensation

     1,677        2,219        (542      (24 )% 

Legal and professional fees

     442        384        58        15

Other

     3,591        4,251        (660      (16 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total general and administrative expense

   $ 9,345      $ 11,020      $ (1,675      (15 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

General and administrative expense for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 decreased by $1.7 million to $9.3 million compared to the same period in 2018. The decrease was primarily driven by lower employee-related costs and share based compensation of $1.1 million and lower other general and administrative expenses of $0.7 million attributable to decrease in bad debt expense and other administrative expenses incurred during normal business operations for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 compared to the nine months ended March 31, 2018.

Liquidity and capital resources

We have incurred cumulative losses and negative cash flows from operations since our inception in 1999, and as of March 31, 2019, we had an accumulated deficit of $125.0 million. It will be several years, if ever, before we have a product candidate ready for commercialization. As noted above, our collaboration agreement with Biogen terminated on March 8, 2019 and we will not receive any milestone-based or royalty payments under that agreement following its termination. Accordingly, we expect that our research and development and general and administrative expenses will continue to increase and as a result, we anticipate that we will require additional capital to fund our operations, which we may raise through a combination of equity offerings, debt financings, other third-party funding, marketing and distribution arrangements and other collaborations, strategic alliances and licensing arrangements.

As of March 31, 2019, we had cash, cash equivalents, and investments totaling $89.2 million. In connection with Bionic Sight’s expected IND Trigger, as defined in AGTC’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2018, for its optogenetic product in the second half of calendar year 2019, we will be obligated to purchase $4.0 million of additional equity in Bionic Sight, upon IND and Institutional Review Board clearance. We believe that our existing cash, cash equivalents, and investments as of March 31, 2019 will be sufficient to enable us to advance planned preclinical studies and clinical trials for our lead product candidates and currently planned discovery programs for approximately two years.

 

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Table of Contents

Cash in excess of immediate requirements is invested in accordance with our investment policy which primarily seeks to maintain adequate liquidity and preserve capital by generally limiting investments to certificates of deposit and investment-grade debt securities that mature within 24 months. As of March 31, 2019, our cash and cash equivalents were held in bank accounts and money market funds, while our investments consisted of certificates of deposit and corporate and government bonds, none of which mature more than 12 months after the balance sheet date, consistent with our investment policy that seeks to maintain adequate liquidity and preserve capital.

Cash flows

The following table sets forth the primary sources and uses of cash for each of the periods set forth below:

 

     Nine
Months Ended
March 31,
     Increase      % Increase  

In thousands

   2019      2018      (Decrease)      (Decrease)  

Net cash provided by (used in):

           

Operating activities

   $ (15,920    $ (25,777    $ 9,857        38

Investing activities

     6,524        42,750        (36,226      (85 )% 

Financing activities

     (99      (46      (53      (115 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net (decrease)/increase in cash and cash equivalents

   $ (9,495    $ 16,927      $ (26,422      (156 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Operating activities. For the nine months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, net cash used in operating activities was primarily the result of cash received from the collaboration with Biogen and lower cash payments for general and administrative expenses, offset by increased payments related to research and development expenses incurred in conducting normal business operation and the impact of changes in our working capital accounts.

Investing activities. Net cash provided by investing activities for the nine months ended March 31, 2019 consisted primarily of cash proceeds of $71.6 million from the maturity of investments, net of investment repurchases of $64.9 million. For the nine months ended March 31, 2018, net cashed provided by investing activities consisted primarily of cash proceeds of $88.2 million from the maturity of investments, net of investment repurchases of $44.8 million.

Financing activities. Net cash used in financing activities during the nine months ended March 31, 2019 consisted primarily of payments for deferred offering costs, partially offset by proceeds from the exercise of common stock options. Net cash used in financing activities during the nine months ended March 31, 2018 was primarily associated with the exercise of common stock options and restricted stock awards.

Operating capital requirements

To date, we have not generated any revenue from product sales. We do not know when, or if, we will generate any revenue from product sales. We do not expect to generate significant revenue from product sales unless and until we obtain regulatory approval of and commercialize one of our current or future product candidates. We anticipate that we will continue to generate losses for the foreseeable future as we continue the development of, and seek regulatory approvals for, our product candidates, and begin to commercialize any approved products. We are subject to all of the risks incident in the development of new gene therapy products, and we may encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications, delays and other unknown factors that may adversely affect our business.

We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents and investments as of March 31, 2019, will be will be sufficient to allow us to generate data from our ongoing clinical programs, to move our pre-clinical optogenetic program in collaboration with Bionic Sight into the clinic and to fund our currently planned research and discovery programs for approximately two years. In order to complete the process of obtaining regulatory approval for our lead product candidates and to build the sales, marketing and distribution infrastructure that we believe will be necessary to commercialize our lead product candidates, if approved, we will require substantial additional funding.

 

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Table of Contents
ITEM 3.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Refer to Part II, Item 7A, “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2018, which is incorporated by reference herein, for a description of our market risks.

 

ITEM 4.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

a) Conclusions Regarding the Effectiveness of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

Our management, with the participation of the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, has evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15e and 15d-15e under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended as of the end of the period covered by this quarterly report). Based on this evaluation the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that these disclosure controls and procedures are effective and designed to ensure that the information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act is recorded, summarized and reported within the requisite time periods.

b) Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15f and 15d-15f under the Exchange Act) identified in connection with the evaluation of our internal control performed during the last fiscal quarter that has materially affected or is reasonably likely to materially affect our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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Table of Contents

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are not a party to any pending legal proceedings. However, because of the nature of our business, we may be subject at any particular time to lawsuits or other claims arising in the ordinary course of our business, and we expect that this will continue to be the case in the future.

 

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

Refer to Part I, Item 1A, “Risk Factors,” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2018 and Part II, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” in our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended December 31, 2018 for a listing of our risk factors. There has been no material change to such risk factors since December 31, 2018.

 

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Table of Contents
ITEM 2.

UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

The following table provides certain information with respect to our purchases of shares of the Company’s common stock during the third fiscal quarter of 2019:

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Period

  Total Number
of Shares
Purchased(a)
    Average
Price
Paid per

Share (a)
    Total Number of Shares
Purchased as Part of
Publicly Announced Plan
    Approximate Dollar Value
of Shares That May Yet Be
Purchased Under the Plan
 

January 1, 2019 through January 31, 2019

    713     $ 3.20       —       $ —    

February 1, 2019 through February 28, 2019

    791     $ 3.29       —       $ —    

March 1, 2019 through March 31, 2019

    667     $ 3.97       —       $ —    
 

 

 

     

 

 

   

Total

    2,171     $ 3.47       —      
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(a) 

These columns reflect the surrender to the Company of an aggregate of 2,171 shares of common stock to satisfy tax withholding obligations in connection with the vesting of restricted stock issued to an employee during the third fiscal quarter of 2019.

 

ITEM 6.

EXHIBITS

 

Exhibit
Number
  

Description

3.1    Fifth Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, event date March 26, 2014, filed on April 1, 2014)
3.2    Amended and Restated Bylaws of Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit  3.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, event date March 26, 2014, filed on April 1, 2014)
31.1*    Rule  13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Principal Executive Officer of Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation
31.2*    Rule  13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Principal Financial Officer of Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation
32.1**    Section 1350 Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer of Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation
101*    Interactive Data Files pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (XBRL)

 

*

Filed herewith.

**

Furnished herewith.

 

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Table of Contents

SIGNATURE

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

APPLIED GENETIC TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

(Registrant)

By:

 

/s/ William Sullivan

 

William Sullivan, Chief Financial Officer

 

Date: May 7, 2019

EX-31.1

Exhibit 31.1

CERTIFICATIONS

I, Susan B. Washer certify that:

1. I have reviewed this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q of Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation;

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

4. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

  (a)

Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

  (b)

Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

  (c)

Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

 

  (d)

Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

  (a)

All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

  (b)

Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: May 7, 2019

 

By:

 

/s/ Susan B. Washer

    Susan B. Washer
   

President and Chief Executive Officer

(Principal Executive Officer)

 

EX-31.2

Exhibit 31.2

CERTIFICATIONS

I, William A. Sullivan, certify that:

1. I have reviewed this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q of Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation;

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

4. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

  (a)

Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

  (b)

Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

  (c)

Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

 

  (d)

Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

  (a)

All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

  (b)

Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: May 7, 2019

 

By:

 

/s/ William A. Sullivan

    William A. Sullivan
   

Chief Financial Officer

(Principal Financial Officer)

EX-32.1

Exhibit 32.1

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350,

AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

In connection with the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q of Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (the “Company”) for the period ended March 31, 2019, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), each of the undersigned officers of the Company hereby certifies, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, that to her or his knowledge:

 

  (1)

the Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and

 

  (2)

the information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the Company.

 

Date: May 7, 2019

 

By:

 

/s/ Susan B. Washer

    Susan B. Washer
   

President and Chief Executive Officer

(Principal Executive Officer)

 

Date: May 7, 2019

 

By:

 

/s/ William A. Sullivan

    William A. Sullivan
   

Chief Financial Officer

(Principal Financial Officer)

A signed original of this written statement required by Section 906, or other document authenticating, acknowledging, or otherwise adopting the signature that appears in typed form within the electronic version of this written statement required by Section 906, has been provided to Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation and will be retained by Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation and furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission or its staff upon request.